Thursday, March 4

Yashaswini Dayama: Big screen isn’t the ultimate goal anymore

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Though she has “a very creative imagination” but Yashaswini Dayama never expected Delhi Crime will receive so much love and win laurels at the Emmys. The actor shares that making the show that revolves around a true incident that “impacted and scarred the entire nation” has been a different experience altogether.

“We never thought this would blow up so much. We’re grateful. Otherwise I feel a bit of a moral dilemma in finding joy out at of somebody’s trauma,” she confesses.

The success of Delhi Crime has opened doors but it hasn’t changed her life suddenly.

“What changed the scenario actually is the democracy web brought in. I love the OTT system. Talented actors who weren’t getting opportunities earlier now have the scope to shine. Also, thankfully I’m now spoken about in a respectable manner because of the projects I’ve done,” says Dayama, whose film and web projects include Dear Zindagi, Phobia (both released in 2016) and Adulting, Made In Heaven, respectively.

“The big screen isn’t the ultimate goal anymore. You could be a Pratik Gandhi and take over the entire country for a web show. Won’t say OTT has reached this epitome of democracy as platforms would still put more money on a star. But there are platforms putting money on newcomers too. Having said that, 70mm charm is unmatchable. I also want to do commercial Bollywood films. I’ve grown up watching and mimicking those dialogues, hook steps…”

The 26-year-old is thankful to her father, actor Ramakant Dayama, for being her guiding force.

“He helped in a very specific way and never forces his decision on me. While he encourages me to go for auditions he tells me if the casting and team would be interesting to work with. In this industry having a basic guidance helps and you don’t have to worry about getting exploited… Also, to make it clear they recognise me as Ramakant’s daughter but no one is throwing roles at me,” she says reacting to nepotism allegations.

“Parents would look out for their children, like my father did for me and my brother. But it’s not like he’s producing films and casting me in them or referring me to other filmmakers. I had posted a photo with my father and these people started saying ‘oh your dad is an actor, nepotism’. Tumko iss word ka matalab bhi pata hain,” she says adding people need to think before accusing someone’s journey and efforts.